Concert

The Magic of African Rhythms: BalanKora: A Harvest of Memories

The Magic of African Rhythms share the beauty and spirit of Kwanzaa through music and stories. The sounds of the balan and kora - griot instruments from West Africa -  reconnect audiences to distant traditions. Kwanzaa is a seven-day festival that celebrates and teaches about the Seven Principles (Swahili: Nguzo Saba) of African culture which contribute to building and reinforcing family, community, and culture among African American people as well as Africans throughout the world African community.

Two percussionists and a dancer share the stage: the dancer, on the left, is facing in toward the percussionists (right should toward audience), standing up on her toes, barefoot. She is leaning forward, arms stretched with energy to her sides, and she is smiling. One percussionist plays a pair of different drums with sticks, facing the audience; the other percussionist faces in toward the dancer, and he is playing a djembe with his hands. He is also smiling. All 3 wear different styles of African garb.

First Night Raleigh Traditional Stage: Amythyst Kiah; Cane Mill Road

Ring in the new year with PineCone at First Night Raleigh! The Traditional Stage will host two great bands again this year - Amythyst Kiah will perform sets at 7, 8, and 10 p.m.; and North Carolina's own Cane Mill Road will perform a special set at 9 p.m. We look forward to celebrating with you this year before the acorn drops us into 2018! Provocative and coolly fierce, Kiah’s ability to cross the boundaries of blues and old-time through reinterpretation is groundbreaking and simply unforgettable.

Thanks to Tharrington Smith for sponsoring the Traditional Stage at First Night Raleigh!

Tharrington Smith, Attorneys at Law; Est 1964

Amythyst Kiah stands in profile with her arms crossed in front of her, looking off into the distance. She wears suspenders, a tie, a collared shirt with sleeves down to her elbows, and a dark bracelet on her left wrist.

Songs from the Road Band

Songs from the Road Band is a supergroup featuring a rotating cast of musicians who all perform with other ensembles and projects throughout the U.S. This may be your only chance to see them share the stage in this configuration - Charles R Humphrey III (Steep Canyon Rangers, bass), Sam Wharton (guitar), Phil Barker (Town Mountain, guitar), Mark Schimick (Josh Daniel/Mark Schimick Project, mandolin), Sam Guthridge (banjo), Tommy Maher (Fireside Collective, dobro), James Schlender (fiddle) (subject to change). They'll have a new CD with them at this concert, too!

Songs from the Road Band: 9 men with light skin in a variety of outfits stand together in front of a colorful wall.

Tim O'Brien and The Banjo Tramps, featuring Jan Fabricius, JD Hutchinson, & Old Man Luedecke

For this special concert, Tim O’Brien performs with Jan Fabricius, JD Hutchinson, and Old Man Luedecke, three artists O’Brien has been collaborating with individually for several years. Collectively, they refer to themselves as "The Banjo Tramps."

Tim O'Brien playing mandolin; he's wearing glasses and a plaid flannel shirt; he has light skin and sandy brown hair.

The Wailin' Jennys

By popular demand, PineCone favorites The Wailin’ Jennys are coming back to Raleigh, and they’ll have a new album in tow! One of today’s most respected folk groups, The Wailin’ Jennys are releasing their first new recording in six years, Fifteen. This long-awaited follow-up to Bright Morning Stars finds the trio bringing their passion and stellar musicianship to a carefully curated collection of some of their favorite songs, including tracks by Tom Petty, Emmylou Harris, and Dolly Parton.

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The three members of The Wailin' Jennys all have long brown hair, worn down. Two stand side by side in the front, each wearing a top in a different shade of gray and facing the viewer. The woman on the left in the lighter gray top wears 2 silver necklaces. Behind and between them, the third woman is looking over her right shoulder. She wears a jean jacket over a beige top.

Orgullo y Alma Latina

Mexican culture is one of the strongest and most prominent cultural influences in the United States, and one part of this culture is the traditional folk dancing. Orgullo y Alma Latina was founded in 2008 as part of the efforts to involve new generations in participating in and educating about Mexican culture through folk dance, reflecting some of the rituals, culture, and traditions. Orgullo y Alma Latina is a traditional folk dance group, composed of a dedicated group of Hispanic dancers, giving them a sense of community and cultural pride, as well as allowing them to sha

Dancers standing outside in a semicircle wearing traditional, colorful Mexican folk dance outfits. The women wear long skirts that they hold out to show the colors, trim, and patterns. Some wear head scarves covering part of their hair, and others wear cloth flowers in their hair. Three men kneel in front of the women, two with their hats in front of them and wear dark slacks and decorated white button-down long sleeve shirts. A 3rd man kneels between 2 in white slacks, a short-sleeved purple shirt, and hat

Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton

Blues artist Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton has WOWED the crowds in Raleigh and beyond with his humor and storytelling. From the streets of the Wide Open Bluegrass StreetFest to the intimacy of Fletcher Theater, his performances are memorable and mesmerizing. This coming year, he’ll perform a full evening concert as part of the Down Home Series! Paxton is a singer and multi-instrumentalist who transforms traditional jazz, blues, folk, and country music into the here and now. He is still in his 20s, and he is often described as a young man with an old soul.

Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton playing banjo beside a tree. He is wearing a hat, a jacket and button-down shirt, and he has a bright smile.

Molly Tuttle

Earlier this year, Molly Tuttle made IBMA history by becoming the first woman to earn the Guitar Player of the Year title! She was also the first woman to be nominated in the Guitar Player of the Year category. Influenced by the songwriting styles of Gillian Welch and Bob Dylan, Tuttle is a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and award winning songwriter with a distinctive voice.

Molly Tuttle - a young woman with light skin, shoulder length brown hair, wearing a jean jacket and dark shirt, with a guitar neck to her right.

Rissi Palmer

Since releasing her self-titled CD in October 2007, singer-songwriter Rissi Palmer has received widespread media attention, including The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, People Magazine, GIANT, New York Post, VIBE, CBS Saturday Early Show, Huffington Post, Extra, CNN, and many more. And with the release of her debut single, "Country Girl," Palmer made music history as the first African-American female to chart a country song since 1987.

Rissi Palmer holds her guitar behind her head, partly visible over her right shoulder. Her dark, curly hair blows partly in front of her face; she is wearing a leather-textured jacket over a lacy white top.

Rhiannon Giddens

Singer-songwriter Rhiannon Giddens is the co-founder of the GRAMMY award-winning string band Carolina Chocolate Drops, in which she also plays banjo and fiddle. In 2016, she earned the Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass, and in 2017 she released Freedom Highway (follow-up to her acclaimed, GRAMMY-nominated solo album Tomorrow Is My Turn); had a recurring role on the CMT show Nashville; delivered a spellbinding keynote at the International Bluegrass Music Association business conference; and earned a MacArthur Genius Grant.

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Rhiannon Giddens, wearing all black (slacks, top, and jacket) standing alone on a dirt road with a cloudy sky above and behind her and tall grasses on either side; a tree is also visible in the distance.

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