Daniels Auditorium

Museum/Art Gallery
5 E Edenton St Raleigh 27601
Phone: 
919-807-7900
Ticket Phone: 
n/a
Parking: 
Four public parking decks lie within two blocks of the Museum of History. Also, the Jones/Edenton Street lot behind the museum offers a small number of spaces ($1 per hour, maximum $8 per day; free parking on weekends). Metered parking is available along Jones and Edenton Streets (free parking on weekends).
Capacity: 
300

Logie Meachum

Blues singer Lorenzo “Logie” Meachum is a storyteller, an educator, a lifelong learner, and a native of Greensboro. He grew up listening to soul music at his family’s juke joint and eventually began playing himself. During the early '80s, Meachum and some of his friends created what is now know as The Piedmont Blues Preservation Society. Meachum particularly enjoys performing for children. He has earned an O.

Blues musician Logie Meachum stands at a microphone, right hand up to his right ear; another musicians is partly visible behind him. Meachum wears a hat, dark glasses, a sport jacket, t-shirt, and jeans.

Orgullo y Alma Latina

Mexican culture is one of the strongest and most prominent cultural influences in the United States, and one part of this culture is the traditional folk dancing. Orgullo y Alma Latina was founded in 2008 as part of the efforts to involve new generations in participating in and educating about Mexican culture through folk dance, reflecting some of the rituals, culture, and traditions. Orgullo y Alma Latina is a traditional folk dance group, composed of a dedicated group of Hispanic dancers, giving them a sense of community and cultural pride, as well as allowing them to sha

Dancers standing outside in a semicircle wearing traditional, colorful Mexican folk dance outfits. The women wear long skirts that they hold out to show the colors, trim, and patterns. Some wear head scarves covering part of their hair, and others wear cloth flowers in their hair. Three men kneel in front of the women, two with their hats in front of them and wear dark slacks and decorated white button-down long sleeve shirts. A 3rd man kneels between 2 in white slacks, a short-sleeved purple shirt, and hat

Rip the Calico

Rip the Calico is a high-energy contra dance band from North Carolina. Drawing heavily from Celtic influences (and origins), the Calicos will take you on a dance journey from dulcet circlings to mad romps across the dance floor. The band features Alison Arnold (Irish flute, Irish and Scottish whistles); Gordon Arnold (cello, guitar, banjo); Mairead Brady (fiddle); and Tyler Johnson (tenor banjo, guitar, mandolin). Celebrate Scottish and Irish culture and their contributions to North Carolina music at the NC Museum of History with Rip the Calico!

Rip the Calico: Alison Arnold on whistle; Mairead Brady on fiddle; Tyler Johnson wearing a kilt and playing mandolin; Gordon Arnold, sitting and playing cello.

Rissi Palmer

Since releasing her self-titled CD in October 2007, singer-songwriter Rissi Palmer has received widespread media attention, including The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, People Magazine, GIANT, New York Post, VIBE, CBS Saturday Early Show, Huffington Post, Extra, CNN, and many more. And with the release of her debut single, "Country Girl," Palmer made music history as the first African-American female to chart a country song since 1987.

Rissi Palmer holds her guitar behind her head, partly visible over her right shoulder. Her dark, curly hair blows partly in front of her face; she is wearing a leather-textured jacket over a lacy white top.

Eliza Meyer

Eliza Meyer is an "old soul," singing and playing traditional string band, old time and early bluegrass music reminiscent of Hazel and Alice, The Carter Family, and Tommy Jarrell. Influenced by traditional ballads of Madison County and the round peak music of Surry County, she plays fiddle, banjo, guitar, and autoharp. Meyer currently studies with Dewey Brown and has taken classes with Alice Gerrard, Eddie Bond, Erynn Marshall and Sheila Kay Adams.

Eliza Meyer, a young woman with shoulder-length brown hair, plays a banjo seated in front of a microphone. Her head is tilted up and her eyes are closed; a Wide Open Bluegrass banner is partially visible in the background.
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